Newsletter #21: Streets, Tracked

Newsletter #21: sent!
(and archived if you missed it)

Doing: facilitating a session on technology for direct action; co-facilitating a discussion about being an activist tech capacity builder; joining a Twitter book club on critical algorithm studies; listening to brilliant and bold public conversations.

Links-wise: attacks, exploitations, freedom to write, freedom of expression, free speech, censorship, terrible policies, tracking phones, wearing cameras, self care as warfare, Chelsea Manning, Roxane Gay, Nicki Minaj.

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Newsletter #20: Rise Up

Newsletter #20: sent!
(and archived if you missed it)

Doing: facilitating a workshop on digital campaigning in crisis response for and with Amnesty International; joining a Mobilisation Lab-hosted and Aspiration-wrangled event on mobile mobilisation; making online noise to #FreeAlaa; listening to and learning from a day of protest.

Links-wise: encrypted chats, encrypted web, obfuscation, interference, phones in prison, love in the age of neoliberalism, Parris Goebel, Becky G and Black Grrrls Riot.

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Allied Media Conference 2015: what, where and let’s connect!

AMC

The Allied Media Conference is about to start!

I’ll be involved in co-wrangling a variety of spaces:

Join us in person, get in touch via hashtag – #AMC2015 or the dedicated ones above – and feel welcome to ping me @beatricemartini to talk all things technology, community, justice and rights!

Newsletter #14: Disobedience and Dissent

Newsletter #14: sent!
(and archived if you missed it)

Work-wise: publishing a piece on digital civil disobedience, its tactics, tools and future threads; sharing details about my Allied Media Conference session on co-creating a podcast on intersectional self-care and how to participate, both in person and online; following conversations about mass surveillance, data espionage, and health and well-being of transgender individuals and communities via hashtag.

Links-wise: divorcing your metadata, the myth of a borderless Internet, visualising absence in the archive of war, a leader-full movement, cybernetic love, Black Panthers, and – who decides what is a woman?

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Real Rad Care – co-creating a podcast on intersectional self-care at #AMC2015

Screen Shot 2015-06-05 at 18.12.58

The Allied Media Conference is about to start (June 18-21, get ready)!
It’s my first one, I’m very excited about it, and I’m also honoured to join as both participant and session facilitator.

One of the sessions I’ll host (a sneak peek of the other one can be found here) is called Real Rad Care: a podcast on intersectional self-care. The name already says a lot!

Continue reading Real Rad Care – co-creating a podcast on intersectional self-care at #AMC2015

The Ethics of Algorithms: notes, emerging questions and resources

Tweets relating to Ferguson after Michael Brown was shot. Map based on mentions of the city and other related key words. Via The Huffington Post.

Algorithms are ruling an ever-growing portion of our lives.
They are adopted by health insurances to assess our chances to get sick, by airlines to make our flights safer, by social media companies to attract our attention to ads, by governments to predict criminal activity.
They can guess with great accuracy a lot of things about us, such as gender, sexual orientation, race, personality type – and can also be applied to influence our political preferences, control what we do, target what we say and, in extreme cases, limit our freedom.

This is not to say that the computational algorithm model should have an evil reputation. Both algorithms and human judgement can be beneficial, malicious, biased – and even wrong. The main difference between them is that over the years (centuries) we developed a pretty good understanding of how human judgement works, while, when it comes to algorithms, we’re just starting to get to know each other.

Continue reading The Ethics of Algorithms: notes, emerging questions and resources

How to design a financial transparency strategy with a role-playing game

Screen Shot 2015-02-12 at 6.59.19 PMFrom Transparency International‘s Financial Jargon Buster: Illicit Financial Flows.

Grateful thanks to Lucy Chambers for the thoughtful feedback provided on this post.

When we talk about financial transparency, numbers and data are understandably what first comes to mind. But are the platforms and portals collecting all that, the real starting point of our work? And how can we make sure that a particular technology which proved successful for a project whose execution we admire, would actually fit the ecosystem we’re working with?

Sounds like our starting point before kicking off any project should actually be much more lo-fi and hands-on: an offline analysis combining our learnings from the most remarkable case studies with a well-tailored and flexible understanding of the context we’re working with.

The interest in exploring a possible answer to this need got Jean Brice Tetka (Transparency International), Jay Bhalla (Open Institute) and me together in a breakout session during the recent Follow The Money workshop.

Continue reading How to design a financial transparency strategy with a role-playing game

On financial transparency and technology: notes from the Follow The Money workshop

Screen Shot 2015-01-28 at 3.15.47 PMFrom BudgIT’s Abacha’s Loot – Where are the returned funds?

Financial transparency can make governments, companies, politics and citizens accountable for their actions and help us fighting corruption in our societies. But how can we design frameworks to create and strengthen a transparent ecosystem? How can a multitude of actors with a diversity of professional backgrounds join their forces to learn from each other and build such frameworks?

These were just some of the burning questions fueling the conversations of the over 100 people getting ready to join the Follow The Money workshop taking place in Berlin on January 20-21. Organised by Transparency and Accountability Initiative, the workshop aimed at gathering policy campaigners, NGO leaders, programmers, researchers, funders and activists from all around the world to encourage connections and collaborations between them, as part of a collective action within the Follow The Money network.

Continue reading On financial transparency and technology: notes from the Follow The Money workshop

Notes from the 2014 Nonprofit Software Development Summit

photoPicture by Beatrice Martini (CC BY-SA 2.0).

Last November I had the great opportunity to join the Nonprofit Software Development Summit.

Organised by Aspiration, the gathering convened a widely diverse crowd, more than 100 people between activists, developers, students, campaigners, nonprofit staff members passionate about creating technology for nonprofit and social justice efforts. I had first heard about it from Misty Avila (Aspiration) and since reading Dirk Slater’s write-up about his 2013 summit experience I had it saved in my check-this-out wish list!

Continue reading Notes from the 2014 Nonprofit Software Development Summit