News! Joining Aspiration as Human Rights Technology Lead

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I’m glad and proud to announce that I have joined Aspiration as Human Rights Technology Lead.

Aspiration connects nonprofit organisations, foundations and activists with software solutions and technology skills that help them better carry out their missions.

My work will focus on building technology capacity strategies in support of global nonprofit human rights organisations, capturing the scope and scale of the role technology plays in human rights efforts in different contexts, and exploring ways to create an inclusive, shared language when discussing technology in human rights efforts.

Stay tuned to read and hear more about it!

Allied Media Conference 2015: what, where and let’s connect!

AMC

The Allied Media Conference is about to start!

I’ll be involved in co-wrangling a variety of spaces:

Join us in person, get in touch via hashtag – #AMC2015 or the dedicated ones above – and feel welcome to ping me @beatricemartini to talk all things technology, community, justice and rights!

Newsletter #14: Disobedience and Dissent

Newsletter #14: sent!
(and archived if you missed it)

Work-wise: publishing a piece on digital civil disobedience, its tactics, tools and future threads; sharing details about my Allied Media Conference session on co-creating a podcast on intersectional self-care and how to participate, both in person and online; following conversations about mass surveillance, data espionage, and health and well-being of transgender individuals and communities via hashtag.

Links-wise: divorcing your metadata, the myth of a borderless Internet, visualising absence in the archive of war, a leader-full movement, cybernetic love, Black Panthers, and – who decides what is a woman?

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Real Rad Care – co-creating a podcast on intersectional self-care at #AMC2015

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The Allied Media Conference is about to start (June 18-21, get ready)!
It’s my first one, I’m very excited about it, and I’m also honoured to join as both participant and session facilitator.

One of the sessions I’ll host (a sneak peek of the other one can be found here) is called Real Rad Care: a podcast on intersectional self-care. The name already says a lot!

Continue reading Real Rad Care – co-creating a podcast on intersectional self-care at #AMC2015

Newsletter #13: Intersections Matter

Newsletter #13: sent!
(and archived if you missed it)

Work-wise: posting an article about how the concept of intersectionality can be a tool to build social change; publishing a piece on Bitch (!) about menstrual hygiene, human rights and all sorts of (written, illustrated, recorded) resources about it; joining a global feminist day of action on digital rights and following threads on art journalism in the digital age via hashtag.

Links-wise: women protesting, death in the browser, predictive policing, trigger warnings, being a Black trans woman, being a butch woman, being a woman wearing the hijab, pixels, Eurovision, motorcycles.

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An intersectional take on technology, rights and justice

There’s a word – which is an entire multi-faceted concept in itself – which comes to my mind very often, whether I’m reading the news, working, talking with loved ones or following someone’s train of thoughts online.

Intersectionality.

The concept it expresses has always been at the core of my perspective of the world and of my work, exploring how technology can most effectively serve justice and rights.

So I decided to write about it, as it might turn out to be useful for others as well – next time you’re scraping data to investigate the patterns behind an issue, supporting a group in building their advocacy strategy, or making up your own mind before going to the polls.

Continue reading An intersectional take on technology, rights and justice

Working with marginalised communities on using data and technology in advocacy

by Maya GaneshDirk Slater and Beatrice Martini.

You are welcome anytime, you’re not like others who come with their own bag of potatoes

It’s with these words that the chair of Women’s Network for Unity (WNU), a sex worker collective based in Phnom Penh, thanked Maya Ganesh and Dirk Slater from Tactical Technology Collective for approaching the work with them with no assumptions or preconceived agenda, but eager to listen and develop their collaboration together.

Mutual trust and respect, real commitment to collaboration and flexibility are all essential elements to be responsibly equipped to work with a marginalised community. And they are not even enough. That’s why, together with Maya and Dirk, we decided to write about the experience as potato-less tech capacity builders, as we think it could greatly help other practitioners planning to collaborate with groups struggling to get their rights honoured and their voices heard.

Continue reading Working with marginalised communities on using data and technology in advocacy

Newsletter #4: Floss And Labour

Newsletter #4: sent!
(and archived if you missed it)

Work-wise: joining a great line-up of speakers in a webinar on financial transparency, getting articles cross-posted far and wide, implementing policies in real life and working on a multitude of projects I can’t say more about just yet. So stay tuned!

Links-wise: how offense discourse traps us into inaction, a broken Congress, the radical political history of the photocopier, a new flossing technique and Queen Latifah.

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Newsletter #3: In Your Shoes

Newsletter #3: sent!
(and archived if you missed it)

Work-wise: writing about how to design a financial transparency strategy with a role-playing game, being honoured to have articles I wrote cross-posted and more widely engaged with and having excellent conversations about tech capacity building, responsible data and participatory research which will feed upcoming write-ups – stay tuned!

Links-wise: labor pains and workers’ rights, institutional harassment, the fabulous Ruth Bader Ginsburg, how to be a pregnant butch, body hair, Beyoncé.

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How to design a financial transparency strategy with a role-playing game

Screen Shot 2015-02-12 at 6.59.19 PMFrom Transparency International‘s Financial Jargon Buster: Illicit Financial Flows.

Grateful thanks to Lucy Chambers for the thoughtful feedback provided on this post.

When we talk about financial transparency, numbers and data are understandably what first comes to mind. But are the platforms and portals collecting all that, the real starting point of our work? And how can we make sure that a particular technology which proved successful for a project whose execution we admire, would actually fit the ecosystem we’re working with?

Sounds like our starting point before kicking off any project should actually be much more lo-fi and hands-on: an offline analysis combining our learnings from the most remarkable case studies with a well-tailored and flexible understanding of the context we’re working with.

The interest in exploring a possible answer to this need got Jean Brice Tetka (Transparency International), Jay Bhalla (Open Institute) and me together in a breakout session during the recent Follow The Money workshop.

Continue reading How to design a financial transparency strategy with a role-playing game