Newsletter #3: In Your Shoes

Newsletter #3: sent!
(and archived if you missed it)

Work-wise: writing about how to design a financial transparency strategy with a role-playing game, being honoured to have articles I wrote cross-posted and more widely engaged with and having excellent conversations about tech capacity building, responsible data and participatory research which will feed upcoming write-ups – stay tuned!

Links-wise: labor pains and workers’ rights, institutional harassment, the fabulous Ruth Bader Ginsburg, how to be a pregnant butch, body hair, Beyoncé.

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How to design a financial transparency strategy with a role-playing game

Screen Shot 2015-02-12 at 6.59.19 PMFrom Transparency International‘s Financial Jargon Buster: Illicit Financial Flows.

Grateful thanks to Lucy Chambers for the thoughtful feedback provided on this post.

When we talk about financial transparency, numbers and data are understandably what first comes to mind. But are the platforms and portals collecting all that, the real starting point of our work? And how can we make sure that a particular technology which proved successful for a project whose execution we admire, would actually fit the ecosystem we’re working with?

Sounds like our starting point before kicking off any project should actually be much more lo-fi and hands-on: an offline analysis combining our learnings from the most remarkable case studies with a well-tailored and flexible understanding of the context we’re working with.

The interest in exploring a possible answer to this need got Jean Brice Tetka (Transparency International), Jay Bhalla (Open Institute) and me together in a breakout session during the recent Follow The Money workshop.

Continue reading How to design a financial transparency strategy with a role-playing game

Newsletter #2: Money Moving

Newsletter #2: sent!
(and archived if you missed it)

Work-wise: notes from the Follow The Money workshop, co-facilitating work on technology for/ and financial transparency, and upcoming developments powered by the post on responsible data storytelling published on this very blog.

Links-wise: privilege and lack of thereof, racist encounters at the opera, queering the beauty industry, no revolution without reflection, Sleater Kinney, blackness and female mustache.

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On financial transparency and technology: notes from the Follow The Money workshop

Screen Shot 2015-01-28 at 3.15.47 PMFrom BudgIT’s Abacha’s Loot – Where are the returned funds?

Financial transparency can make governments, companies, politics and citizens accountable for their actions and help us fighting corruption in our societies. But how can we design frameworks to create and strengthen a transparent ecosystem? How can a multitude of actors with a diversity of professional backgrounds join their forces to learn from each other and build such frameworks?

These were just some of the burning questions fueling the conversations of the over 100 people getting ready to join the Follow The Money workshop taking place in Berlin on January 20-21. Organised by Transparency and Accountability Initiative, the workshop aimed at gathering policy campaigners, NGO leaders, programmers, researchers, funders and activists from all around the world to encourage connections and collaborations between them, as part of a collective action within the Follow The Money network.

Continue reading On financial transparency and technology: notes from the Follow The Money workshop

Newsletter #1: First Things First

Newsletter #1: sent!
(and archived if you missed it)

Work-wise: notes from the the 2014 Nonprofit Software Development Summit, the start of a collective conversation on responsible data storytelling, and outcome stories from the Community Building track co-curated at Mozilla Festival.

Links-wise: a new civil rights movement, algorithms, feminism, domestic worker workforce, fierce music, weaponized theater. And more.

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Launching a new newsletter! #1 out tomorrow

I’m a very curious person. I like asking people what they’re up to/ working on and discovering more about their interests, and also never stop finding and enjoying great content online.
All these things make me think, also about topics I maybe never thought about before and discover are very important for me to be aware of, enrich and inspire me and sometimes also make me laugh or dance (!)
I also love sharing my favourite findings, and often others seem to like them, so – I’m starting a newsletter!

Delivered to your inbox up to 4 times a month, it’ll be about what I’m working on, writing about & loving from the Internet. Tomorrow I’ll send out the first one and you can subscribe here!

See you there!

On data storytelling – and how to make it responsibly

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 presetPicture from the Responsible Data Storytelling session, by Beatrice Martini (CC BY-SA 2.0).

Thanks to Nasma Ahmed, Renee Black and Sarah Moncelle for collaborating on editing this blogpost.

Stories are a key element of knowledge, and as such fuel evidence and empowerment. They can help communicate problems and challenges we might not have experienced personally, but that are key to be aware of in order to inform our understanding and agency as active members of our societies.

A compelling way to tell stories is through data. Presented as numbers, percentages and visualisations, data can transmit a message directly and sharply, often also helping going beyond misunderstandings caused by language or tone unclarity in our communication.

But are all data good (as in “not harmful”)? Is “the more the merrier” the most helpful way to work with them? Spoiler alert: no, and no.

Continue reading On data storytelling – and how to make it responsibly

Notes from the 2014 Nonprofit Software Development Summit

photoPicture by Beatrice Martini (CC BY-SA 2.0).

Last November I had the great opportunity to join the Nonprofit Software Development Summit.

Organised by Aspiration, the gathering convened a widely diverse crowd, more than 100 people between activists, developers, students, campaigners, nonprofit staff members passionate about creating technology for nonprofit and social justice efforts. I had first heard about it from Misty Avila (Aspiration) and since reading Dirk Slater’s write-up about his 2013 summit experience I had it saved in my check-this-out wish list!

Continue reading Notes from the 2014 Nonprofit Software Development Summit

Welcome!

This is my new blog – happy to see you here!
Anyone with interest in technology, justice, rights and transparency is very welcome to read, follow and interact with it.

My aim – at least right now – is to create a space to collect and share write-ups about

  • reflections and researches which might inspire upcoming developments,
  • projects currently in progress,
  • learnings and findings.

The blog is hosted on a website with my name, but I’ll have the pleasure to be joined by co-authors contributing their knowledge and expertise. Most of my work is made of participation and collaboration and I’d like this platform to express it in its own nature, from its content to how it’s produced.

The first articles are just getting ready to be published. Check this space!